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Five great places to visit in the summer

cze 06

Perhaps you know them, maybe you read about them for the first time. One thing is certain: they are amazing and it is worth knowing that they exist before you go abroad to look for similar attractions.

The first of such places is the curved Forest in Gryfino. They say about it that there is not such a strange forest anywhere else in Poland, and even in the whole world. Over the years, theories about the reason for its appearance have multiplied. So, what does it mean? Try to imagine more than 400 pines, which instead of growing straight up to the sky, are fantastically bent and twisted. Their curvature just above the ground reaches 90 degrees!

Another place on the „must do” list are the Moving Dunes in Łeba, located in the Słowiński National Park. It is Europe’s largest belt of moving dunes. You can feel the constant wind in the dunes and this is what makes them move and reach a height of several dozen metres. When you stand on the top of Łącka Dune and look at the surrounding landscape, you will feel like being in an endless desert.

The Leaning Tower is not only in Pisa? In a small town in Poland in Ząbkowice Śląskie there is also the Leaning Tower. Where did the building come from? The theories state that it is a remnant of a castle that existed in this place before the location of the city, or that it was built as a bell tower. The tower has a deviation of more than two metres from the vertical. And, as it happens in the case of such amazing places, everyone still quarrels about where this curvature came from.

Next we move near to the Kaliningrad District to see another place on the map of Poland. The pyramid in Rapa, which stands in the middle of a forest near Banie Mazurskie. Its use is typical – the pyramid is a tomb; more specifically the tomb of the Fahrenheit family. The Fahrenheits, who owned the Rapa estate, were also travelling people, curious about the world and new solutions. The pyramid is built with the principles of ancient builders in mind, so that it can serve as a tomb in the best possible way.

We remain in the same region of Poland where there are bridges in Stańczyki. The bridges are reminiscent of ancient aqueducts and were designed probably in 1905 by Italian architects. There is one of the highest bridges in Poland (36.5 m), which years ago was a part of the railway route – just imagine what views the train travellers had from it!

(KB)

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Z kamerą wśród zwierząt – na wesoło!

maj 30

Kudłate, cętkowane, w paski – świat zwierząt to prawdziwa różnorodność! Pełzające, latające, biegające, pływające, ale przede wszystkim niezmiernie fascynujące. Zapraszamy do naszego fotograficznego zwierzyńca!

Dobrze czasem odpocząć od fanów…

Sen w biały dzień jeszcze nikomu nie zaszkodził

Kiedy tylko jedna owca zwróci uwagę na fotografa, a reszta to barany

Spokój, cisza, piękno. Jak tu nie kochać Tatr?

Czy te oczy mogą kłamać?

Na łące, na łące fajnie jest!

Widzieliście kiedyś kota, który nie jest zadowolony z Waszych czułości?

Nie dotykać mojej żony!

Niech patrzą! Miłość to miłość.

Kroczek do przodu, kroczek do tyłu. Zobaczymy za którym razem złapie mnie w całości.

Kiedy wreszcie sobie pójdą i przestaną na mnie patrzeć?

Nie próbujcie po nas przechodzić! Teraz to my jesteśmy u siebie

Fotografie: K. Tarczoń

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What the quack? – animal noises in different languages

kwi 30

“What does the fox say?” asked a comedic one hit wonder a few years ago. The question is however not what but where does it say it. Did you know that in a different part of the world animals say a completely different thing? Wait, but does that mean that animals are multilingual? What? Really? Well, unfortunately not. But humans on the other hand are. Onomatopoeia (a word that phonetically imitates the sound that it describes) vary as languages that we use differ.

There is no ‘universal’ sound for an animal. If you ask a 5-year-old in Poland to imitate the dog, you would hear “hau, hau” in response, but a child in Spain will say “guau, guau”. In Japan dogs do “wan, wan”, “blaf, blaf” in the Netherlands, “hev, hev” in Turkey and “woof, woof” in Britain. What about our precious cats? If you want to sound like a cat in Sweden you need to say: “mjau!”, in Vietnam “meo!” and in Britain “meow!”. Interestingly, Japanese is the only language that doesn’t start a cat’s noise with the letter “m” (“nyan, nyan”). Other pets, such as birds, in France do “cui-cui”, Greece “tsiou, tsiou” and in Japan “chun, chun”. Ok, so let’s go outside! A horse in Poland goes “I-ha-ha!”, “I-go-go” in Russia and “vrinsk” in the Netherlands. Next, a bee: “sum!” in Germany, “boong” in Korea and “bzzz” in Britain. A Chinese frog makes the sound “guo, gou”, a Thai “op, op”, a Hungarian “brekeke” and an Italian “cra, cra”.

Linguists argue that the difference is not only lingual but also cultural. “In English we have rather more sound words for dogs (woof, yap, bow wow, ruff, growl) than in any other language as English-speaking countries tend to have the highest dog ownership per capita. There are also clear differences when you look at how the same language is used across difference geographies and environments. In Australia, camels have been introduced in the outback and so we have ‘grumph’. Unsurprisingly I haven’t come across any sound for a camel in the US or UK. Similarly, in mainland Spain there is ‘clou, clou’ for a male turkey, but in Mexico they say ‘goro-goro-goro’,” says Professor Derek Abbott from the University of Adelaide (source: theguardian.com).

What seems to be the cutest onomatopoeia is a mouse’s – and wait for it, in almost all languages: “pip, pip” in Sweden, “cin, cin” in Hungary, “jjik” in Korea and “squitt” in Italy. And finally, if you want to sound like a duck in Poland use “kwa, kwa”, in Romania “mac”; “rap” in Denmark, “quack, quack” in Britain, “coin” in France and “prӓӓks” in Estonia.

It doesn’t matter where you are, the language of animals will differ slightly. Next time while learning a new one, dig a little deeper to find out some cute, new onomatopoeias. It will help you understand that particular culture better and at least will bring some fun to your dictionary!

(MW)

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‘Millennials’ and ‘centennials’ – who are they?

kwi 19

Do you feel sometimes that you totally don’t understand people who are only a few years older or younger than you? Probably the reason is that you belong to different technological generations. Let’s take a look at two of them.


Millennials (generation Y)

People called ‘millennials’ were born more or less between 1982 and 1996 (the dates can be a little different depending on the country). They remember what the world without the Internet looked like, they know what a Walkman or Discman is, however in the last years they have got used to new technologies such as smartphones or tablets. Technological development is now something natural for them and they are not afraid of learning new things. They are also, in contrast to their parents or grandparents, idealists who are more open to changes. Many of them prefer to do the job they really like, even if they earn less money in this case. ‘Millennials’ are usually individuals, sometimes too sensitive, easy to frustrate. They like to travel and get to know new places and cultures. Their main problem can be a lack of stability – for example, with having their own flat (in many countries it is almost impossible to buy one without taking out a mortgage) or the same job for more than a few years.

Centennials (generation Z)

‘Centennials’ were born after 1996 (approximately) and they are the first generation that does not know a life without advanced technology, the Internet and social media. If you have ever seen a few-years-old child playing on the smartphone much better than his/her parents, you know exactly what we are talking about. ‘Centennials’ learn many things on their own (usually from the Internet, for example from YouTube movies). They don’t care too much about their privacy, showing to the world all the details from their lives and measuring their success by the amount of ‘likes’ they receive. They often prefer to make contact with their friends via social media than face to face, and their idols are people known only from YouTube. ‘Centennials’ also seem to be more tolerant and sensitive about global issues. Unfortunately, it is hard to say now what their work life will look like, because most of them are still children or teenagers.

Do you identify with one of these generations? Can you imagine your life without a new technology? Share your opinion with us!

(BB)

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Wiosna, cieplejszy wieje wiatr!

kwi 12

W końcu z nami! Długo wyczekiwana, wytęskniona wiosna. A co jest jej nieodłącznym elementem? Kwiaty! Piękne, żywe dywany, kwitnące rabatki i cieszące oko zielone łąki. Zapraszamy do naszego fotograficznego ogrodu!

Obrazy kwiatami malowane

Tulipan pięknieje w kroplach deszczu

Trawa zroszona wiosenną mżawką – orzeźwiający widok!

Wypatrzyć takie piękności w trawie – radość dla oczu i… obiektywu!

Wiosna to bardzo pracowity czas dla pszczółek

Która kobieta nie lubi dostawać tulipanów? :)

Pierwsze przebiśniegi to obietnica rychłej wiosny

Krokusy należą do jednych z najchętniej fotografowanych kwiatów

Magnolio! Z jaką niecierpliwością ciebie wyczekujemy!

Przebiśnieg nawet wystający spod śniegu jest uciechą dla oczu

Narcyz zawsze odznacza się nieprzeciętną urodą

Ślimak, ślimak wystaw rogi!

Fotografie: K. Tarczoń

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